Popsicle Stick Weave

Interlocking popsicle sticks in a chain adds tension to the construct. When released, the release motion of the sticks looks like a wave and scatters the sticks all over the area. It’s a great game to play, since children need to practice some motorics while at the same time learning about conversion of elastic potential energy into kinetic energy.

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Using Video Analysis in the Science Classroom

Or how does the ant survive the fall?

Mobile learning is a concept as old as time. Taking a book for learning to the park for example is one way to take learning to the mobile level. The concept of mobility as “anywhere and anytime” isn’t new. But the use of mobile devices like tables and smartphones brings it to a whole new level. And as a science teacher, I think a lot about how to integrate digital media into the classroom. Let me show you an example of how implementation could work. I’ll use the freely falling coffee filter to demonstrate air friction.

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Floating Paper Clips

Is it science or is it magic? It is probably both and this makes experiments like the floating paper clips so fascinating and fun to implement in the science classroom. You can try it yourself and have your students debate about the experiment. With a little caution they can even make paper clips float on the water themselves.

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Another physics toy! The magical everturning spinning top

This is a tough one to figure out but goes perfectly with my last experiment, the electric motor. And with this being said, I think I already might have given you an idea on how to explain this amazing physics toy.

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Simple model of an electric motor

There is nothing more satisfying than building your own model of already functioning technology to understand the mechanisms behind it. In today’s post I’ll show you how you can build your own model of an electric engine.

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The Candle Elevator

Using phenomena in science classroom as a means to spark inquiry is a great way to start a lesson or even a unit. Besides the easy access to the physics and science behind the phenomenon, science content can be distributed as well as scientific processes. Students not only learn about basic principles, they also learn scientific inquiry and reasoning as well as experimental skills.

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The drinking bird or how toys promote science learning

Science Education profits heavily from toys like the drinking bird or fuel cell toy vehicles. Positive memories from childhood playing and natural curiousity spark children’s interest in the toy and therefore in the content, when used accordingly. Giving them time to explore hands-on is the perfect way of every science teacher into the heart of their students.

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