What is fluorescence?

And why should you know?

What is she doing in the lab, you ask? Isn’t that dangerous? Who let her in there? Don’t worry! I’m nowhere near a laboratory and these pictures are actually from my sister. For some reason, she became a talented scientist and is currently writing her bachelor thesis in nanoscience with a specialisation in organic chemistry. And she is doing pretty cool stuff and I only understand half of it. But I do understand the part about fluorescence and it’s not only pretty but also very useful.

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Lunar and Solar Eclipses

Modelling with an apple and an egg

Last Tuesday, on July 16th 2019, we had a partial lunar eclipse which was visible in Germany. Unfortunately it was too cloudy for me to see but when I was 8, there was a solar eclipse right over Germany (in 1999) and I loved the event. I didn’t quite understand how rare solar eclipses are when you don’t travel to see one. I guess I’d appreciate it so much more now. Lunar eclipses are more common but still events for themselves. And what I also love about eclipses is that there are so many ways to visualize and understand these phenomena. I’ll explain three in this post.

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Teaching about Inertia

Spinning eggs

If you are anything like me, you have probably prepared hard boiled eggs once, wanting to eat them the next day and put them back into the fridge. And when you’ve wanted to take them out the next day, you realized you put them right next to the raw eggs. What now? I admit, this happens more often than I would like it to be true. What a relief that I can use physics to help me find my hardboiled eggs.

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Learning about energy transfer with color changing straws

The phenomenon of Thermochromism

When I was a child, I would stand in front of fair booths and try on all sorts of mood rings and adore them. The change of color fascinated me. I really wanted to purchase one and my parents didn’t let me. Oh how unfair the world seemed to me. I didn’t care that these rings weren’t worth the money, I just loved watching the colors turn.
Today, I know about the phenomenon of thermochromism and it still fascinates me. But I’ve also studied a little bit of physics and now understand the science behind the phenomenon so much better than when I was a kid. In this blog post, I’ll show you what thermochromism is, why it occurs and what we can learn about energy from it.

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Polaris and Constellations

The STEM challenge by the ICSE

ICSE – what exactly is that? It stands for International Center of STEM Education and it’s based at the University of Education in Freiburg, Germany. The ICSE is an internationally connected research center with a special focus in practice-related research and its transfer into practice. I know this, because I work at the MaSDiV project which is affiliated with the ICSE. I’ll come back to that in another post because today I want to talk about the STEM challenge, the ICSE posed on Twitter.

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Exploring Snell’s Law

“Look – the paddle has a kink!”

Admittedly, I don’t have a paddle for this blog post. But I have a pen. That’s basically the same when it comes to optics. And today I did not only prepare one, but TWO experiments for exploring Snell’s Law. And they are great for younger students because they both seem like magic. And thank you to Mirjam (@fascinocean_kiel) and her great idea for this post – without her niece I wouldn’t have thought of how fascinating this phenomenon can be even for younger children.

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Hair and Walls and Static Electricity

If you have been following my blog, you might know already, that I love a good hands-on experiment served with the good ol’ inquiry. These static electricity experiments I’m going to explain are just that – prompted with a question, they awe students into wanting to inquiry the nature of hair standing to all sides, balloon floating on the ceiling and maybe even waterbending with a comb. So let’s dive into the physics behind these fascinating experiments.

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